Agricola

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Publisher: Z-Man Games
Designer: Uwe Rosenberg
Publication Year: 2007
Game Paradise SKU: g215010
   
Average Playtime: 2 hours and 30 minutes
Minimum Players: 1
Maximum Players: 5
   
Suitable Audience: Family Friendly
Genre: Resource Management
   
Description:

Agricola was mentioned in the following blog posts...

Sodbusters: Good, but not for the faint of heart

     ...uggest we just play Agricola again.  Well, we finally settled down to learn how to play it, and I can't say I blame him for putting it off any more. Let me say up front, the game is good.  It is a ...

Agricola - Primitive subsistance farming was never more fun

     ... for the game "Agricola". These hand made clay pieces are meant to substitute the little wooden cubes and disks that come with the game. "][/caption] The great replay value of the game h...

Breaking the cardboard crack addiction

     ...dboard crack addict....

Trailer Park Wars: Watch out Steve Jackson, you've got competition!

     ...is saying something....

Power Grid: An extremely well balanced strategy game

     ...my favorite titles: Agricola. This time it was pointed out to me that we have yet to mention the other title I'm always trying to get people to play with me: Power Grid. Null_Entry knows me well, for ...

Who's Yer Con 2011

     ...hroughout the day:  Agricola, Modern Art, Catch Phrase, Snatch, Ascension, and Caladea.  Everyone seemed to have a really great time.  We also lent a hand over at LadyFlame's pick up game table.  We p...

Duck Duck Safari: Surprisingly good games in one small package

     ...ted on the level of Agricola or Sodbusters, but for a kids game, we found this to be rather complex, which we actually really liked and were rather impressed by. They didn't dumb everything down, whic...

Gen Con 2011

     ...ll", "Modern Art", "Agricola", and "Wasabi".   Everyone seemed to have a really good time. Friday was more chain mail class (which I mentioned earlier), and a "Magic: The Gathering" draft for my hu...

Gamer Challenge for the week of January 30th

     ... two hours, such as Agricola or Powergrid, are about as meaty as we get on these nights.  Why is that?  Because the night is more about socializing.  It's loud, so rules are hard to hear.  We have din...

Description from BoardgameNews In Agricola, you're a farmer in a wooden shack with your spouse and little else. On a turn, you get to take only two actions, one for you and one for the spouse, from all the possibilities you'll find on a farm: collecting clay, wood, or stone; building fences; and so on. You might think about having kids in order to get more work accomplished, but first you need to expand your house. And what are you going to feed all the little rugrats? The game supports many levels of complexity, mainly through the use (or non-use) of two of its main types of cards, Minor Improvements and Occupations. In the beginner's version (called the Family Variant in the U.S. release), these cards are not used at all. For advanced play, the U.S. release includes three levels of both types of cards; Basic (E-deck), Interactive (I-deck), and Complex (K-deck), and the rulebook encourages players to experiment with the various decks and mixtures thereof. Aftermarket decks such as the Z-Deck and the L-Deck also exist. Agricola is a turn-based game. There are 14 game rounds occurring in 6 stages, with a Harvest at the end of each stage (after Rounds 4, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 14). Each player starts with two playing tokens (farmer and spouse) and thus can take two turns, or actions, per round. There are multiple options, and while the game progresses, you'll have more and more: first thing in a round, a new action card is flipped over. Problem: Each action can be taken by only one player each round, so it's important to do some things with high preference. Each player also starts with a hand of 7 Occupation cards (of more than 160 total) and 7 Minor Improvement cards (of more than 140 total) that he/she may use during the game if they fit in his/her strategy. Speaking of which, there are countless strategies, some depending on your card hand. Sometimes it's a good choice to stay on course, and sometimes it is better to react to your opponents' actions.