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Telestration Give Away Winners!

A couple of weeks ago we offered up a couple of copies of Telestrations as prizes to readers who submitted their funny gaming stories.  Last Friday was our deadline and I am pleased to announce that we have our winners!  Congrats to Mike Maxson and Aiden Rogers for their winning submissions!

Win, lose, or…

Submitted by Aiden Rogers:

Win, lose, or...

Win, lose, or...

Growing up, we spent every holiday with my dad’s family.  We always sat around waiting for someone to eat that last piece of ham, trek down the hallway, and bring out…the games.  We never played boring old board games; we had to pick something with the opportunity for humor, silliness, and the maximum embarassment.  It’s how we were, and we as kids sat around waiting for that day we were old enough or someone would take pity and put us on a team.  Scattergories.  Pictionary.  Taboo.  We wanted to play.  We’d play sitting on our parents’ laps if we had to, but we wanted in the fun.  And no one was exempt, not even my mother, who was not particularly liked by that side of the family.  One year, my great-aunt Sharon brought out Win, Lose, or Draw (the precursor, of course, to Pictionary).  We set up teams and were ready to go.

Is that a horse?

Mom was less than enthusiastic, knowing she never fit in and knowing she wasn’t the best artist, and wondering what humiliation lie in front of her.  When it came her turn, she got up to the easel and picked up the marker and started drawing.  Granny peeked in from where she was cleaning up in the kitchen, and she said, “What are you guys playing?”  At that moment, my dad turned to answer her and said, “Win, Lose or…” and stopped.  He looked at the board and finished, “…is that a horse???”  Everyone laughed and mom wasn’t too embarrassed about it, even though it was not, in fact, supposed to be a horse.  And to this day, we all share a hearty laugh when someone suggests a game.  Because the first suggestion is always, “Win, Lose, or Is That a Horse?”

You just can’t trust technology.

Submitted by Mike Maxson:

Iwas playing a tabletop roleplaying game with some friends of mine called Mage: The Ascension.  In this game we were all playing a group of magically powerful characters called mages.  All of our characters lived together in a fairly large house, and in this particular instance one of the characters was away at work.  On this day we got a visit from a few men in black suits who wanted to talk to me.  My character was kind of a mad scientist and I was more than happy to show them around some of my more stable experiments.  They wanted me to develop some tech for them. I said that I’d be happy to take the challenge and we set up a meeting a few days later in Tokyo at their HQ. As they were getting ready to leave I noticed that one of them had done a magical effect targeted at my computer system. I immediately started looking over my equipment checking for what had been done, but I had no real way to accuse the men. I don’t remember the exact context, but one of them told me “You just can’t trust technology.”
While I was inside talking to the agents Allen comes home. He sees the strange car in the drive and decides to do some snooping. The idea of snooping was a good one, but the execution went poorly. Somehow Allen got inside the car (go him!) and snooped around but didn’t really find much of any importance. He did find a rather nice, large gun. I think it was a rifle of some kind. He decided that he wanted to ensure that the gun didn’t work properly, so he decided to heat up the bullet in the chamber so that it would swell and lodge itself in the gun. At this point the GM gave Allen the predictable “Are you sure you want to do that?”. Allen has not been gaming for very long, so he didn’t recognize this as the warning that it was.
There is not really a mechanism for what happened, so Victor had to wing it a bit. The short version is that Allan heated up the bullet and the gun enough to trigger not only the bullet in the chamber, but also the rest of the clip. It probably wasn’t very realistic, but it was very theatrical. The next problem with this scenario comes from the fact that Allen was inside the car with the gun, right next to it in fact, when it exploded. Allen took a substantial amount of damage, exited the car, and hid in the bushes next to the house.
Of course, an explosion like that attracted the attention of everyone on the grounds and soon we were all looking at the agents’ car with its windows blown out and shrapnel all over the interior. The agents were sputtering, but everyone that they knew to be home had been accounted for. I looked at the agent who had said it to me before and repeated “You just can’t trust technology.” I got extra experience for that.

I was playing a tabletop roleplaying game with some friends of mine called Mage: The Ascension.  In this game we were all playing a group of magically powerful characters called mages.  All of our characters lived together in a fairly large house, and in this particular instance one of the characters was away at work.  On this day we got a visit from a few men in black suits who wanted to talk to me.  My character was kind of a mad scientist and I was more than happy to show them around some of my more stable experiments.  They wanted me to develop some tech for them. I said that I’d be happy to take the challenge and we set up a meeting a few days later in Tokyo at their HQ. As they were getting ready to leave I noticed that one of them had done a magical effect targeted at my computer system. I immediately started looking over my equipment checking for what had been done, but I had no real way to accuse the men. I don’t remember the exact context, but one of them told me “You just can’t trust technology.”

While I was inside talking to the agents Allen comes home. He sees the strange car in the drive and decides to do some snooping. The idea of snooping was a good one, but the execution went poorly. Somehow Allen got inside the car (go him!) and snooped around but didn’t really find much of any importance. He did find a rather nice, large gun. I think it was a rifle of some kind. He decided that he wanted to ensure that the gun didn’t work properly, so he decided to heat up the bullet in the chamber so that it would swell and lodge itself in the gun. At this point the GM gave Allen the predictable “Are you sure you want to do that?”. Allen has not been gaming for very long, so he didn’t recognize this as the warning that it was.

There is not really a mechanism for what happened, so Victor had to wing it a bit. The short version is that Allan heated up the bullet and the gun enough to trigger not only the bullet in the chamber, but also the rest of the clip. It probably wasn’t very realistic, but it was very theatrical. The next problem with this scenario comes from the fact that Allen was inside the car with the gun, right next to it in fact, when it exploded. Allen took a substantial amount of damage, exited the car, and hid in the bushes next to the house.

Of course, an explosion like that attracted the attention of everyone on the grounds and soon we were all looking at the agents’ car with its windows blown out and shrapnel all over the interior. The agents were sputtering, but everyone that they knew to be home had been accounted for. I looked at the agent who had said it to me before and repeated “You just can’t trust technology.” I got extra experience for that.

Congrats again to our winners and thank you to everyone who participated in our giveaway, and thank you to USAopoly  for the opportunity to shower our readers with fun games!

This entry was posted by The_Null_Entry on Monday, December 12th, 2011 at 4:23 pm and is filed under Contests, Events and Tournaments .
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